Telling Shakespeare’s Story: How to Avoid the Boring

As I may have mentioned before, my daughter (and I, let’s be honest) is a Shakespeare groupie. She has requested to do a deep dive into Shakespeare next year. Overachiever that she is (love her, *kiss kiss*), she wanted to read all the plays. I think I’ve talked her down off that particular ledge. We’ll read as many plays as we can comfortably manage, though.

Here’s the big question: How does a homeschooler do Shakespeare in a way that avoids the dreaded Boring Shakespeare Experience? That was my Shakespeare experience, anyway. I recall reading Macbeth twice (I switched classes mid-year, so I got to do Macbeth twice). I recall reading it. I recall analyzing the theme of blood in the play. I recall watching this twice (I think I still have scars from that viewing experience.  Lady Macbeth is quite the sex pot in this production). But I recall no warm fuzzy memories of my Shakespeare study.

Shakespeare can be boring. He tends to drag. Hamlet is a yawny experience, even when seen live (I can testify to that). So why does my daughter love it?

Well, she acted it first. Her primary experience with Shakespeare comes from being part of a troupe. Here’s a shot of the outdoor venue where the high school kids get their Shakespeare on:

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It’s delightful. Olivia is looking forward to doing a tragedy or comedy this summer. She loves the acting. She loves the mentors. She loves the kids. Acting Shakespeare is a great gateway to the plays.

The Folger Shakespeare Library agrees. We plan to use their resources that help kids learn Shakespeare by acting. We’ll either use these lessons at home or through our local co-op Shakespeare class happening this year. Who knew there was an engaging way to do Shakespeare? Honestly, I never remember acting out a single scene in high school. I might have enjoyed the experience more if I had been given a scene, told to cut it down to X number of lines, and then been charged to act it out in front of the class. That’s the Folger approach.

Shakespeare Set Free #3

Okay, so we’ll act out some Shakespeare, both in a troupe and through a co-op class. We’ll also act out some of the funny Shakespeare (if we have time) in that class. Olivia and I love The Complete Works of Shakespeare, Abridged. This comic mash up brings all of Shakespeare’s plays into one hilarious production. See it if you can. We just saw this company’s latest production at the Folger, William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play. Hilarious. I think Shakespeare spoofs add a modern dimension to the plays that makes a reading of the actual plays all the richer.

And let’s not forget musicals, of course. I’ve talked about Olivia’s passion for musicals before. Something Rotten is touring this year. We’re going to see it. Here’s the synopsis from our local theater:

Something Rotten! is Broadway’s big, fat hit! (New York Post). Set in 1595, this hilarious smash tells the story of Nick and Nigel Bottom, two brothers who are desperate to write a hit play. When a local soothsayer foretells that the future of theatre involves singing, dancing and acting at the same time, Nick and Nigel set out to write the world’s very first MUSICAL! With its heart on its ruffled sleeve and sequins in its soul, Something Rotten! is The Producers +The Book of Mormon x The Drowsy Chaperone. Squared! (New York Magazine).

What’s not to love about that? We watched a few of the songs online and we know we’re going to love every Elizabethan moment of that show.  As I said, watching the spoofing Shakespeare makes the actual reading of the plays all the merrier.

Acting, reading, and watching. That’s our Shakespeare plan. Oh, and we plan to round things off with a Brave Writer class or two, of course. Hamlet is being offered this spring. I believe Macbeth is on tap for next spring. We just caught Chesapeake Shakespeare’s production of Macbeth, so I think we’ll enjoy another visit with the Thane of Cawdor next year.

Do you have any plans to interact with the Bard? How do you plan to spice things up to avoid the Boring Shakespeare Experience? I did a Periscope on this topic, too. Here it is!

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